The Healing Process Essay

1063 Words 5 Pages
The Healing Process

This is a brief psychological overview of the healing process. The image of healing is best described by Gloria Vanderbilt in "A Mother's Story" when she talks of breaking the invisible unbreakable glass bubble which enclosed her that kept her always anticipating loss with echoes of all past losses. She wrote, for example (Page 3),"Some of us are born with a sense of loss there from the beginning, and it pervades us throughout our lives. Loss, as defined, as deprivation, can be interpreted as being born into a world that does not include a nurturing mother and father. We are captured in an unbreakable glass bubble, undetected by others, and are forever seeking ways to break out, for if we can,
surely
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This was "not merely a matter of fulfilling one's own particular talents; it also involves actualizing those potentialities that one has as a human being" The key for Maslow in engaging in this process was that of openness. People must be (Page 117) "receptive and responsive to information from the world and from themselves. They do not repress or ignore uncomfortable facts and problems and their view of these facts and problems is not distorted by wishes, fears, past experiences or prejudices". This freshness of perspective permits spontaneity, creativity which then promotes growth.
Growth is perceived as being open to one's self and to others which leads to empathy.      Maslow felt that the purpose of therapy with its "unconditional positive regard" was to lead the person to such growth and that the result would be love, courage, creativeness, kindness and altruism. Breaking the old habits was the key. Page 127 "To the extent that one is open, one rises above the level of an automaton and becomes more of a creative, autonomous subject. And by these means, openness helps give us a sense that our lives are rewarding".

     Most psychologists seem to feel therapy is paramount in the process of change. Schoen, says for example,(Page 52) that before therapy "we are walled off in ourselves, often