The Healthcare Plan Of Clinton

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THE HEALTHCARE PLAN OF CLINTON Clinton’s Healthcare Plan: the Reasons Why It Failed In the United States the issue of government funded healthcare programs has always been one of importance drawing attentions of many and involving myriads of debate sessions. Still now people take quite interest in dissecting and finally commenting on why Obamacare is a success and why Clintoncare/Hillarycare was not. But whatever may be the reason behind such indulgence, it must be analyzed why such a welfare effort like President Clinton’s healthcare plan ultimately failed even though having some great features which, if implemented properly, would have changed the course of healthcare policies in the United States for a considerable period of…show more content…
Congress, as one of the key players, was seriously considering plans to provide universal health coverage on one hand, and physicians, big businesses, and Republican lawmakers, on the other hand, as various interest groups opposing the Congress, were more interested in blocking the proposals of the Congress (Bok, 1998). The situation was a dilemmatic one and some reformation was needed. Clinton felt the nerve of the majority of the populace who were in favor of healthcare reform and hence, he made healthcare a primary weapon in his election campaigns. With his win the issue of healthcare reform came to forefront. It must be noted that gradually American businesses were singing in the tune of Clinton due to the fear of losing further businesses due to their disadvantageous position fueled by the rising health costs in the United States and “Growing segments of the medical community expresses a desire to consider reforms; even hospitals seemed interested in some scheme that would spare them the heavy burden of giving free medical care to the uninsured” (Bok, 1998). Moreover, Clinton was obliged to introduce a healthcare reform policy also due to the fact that “large majorities of the public rated health care reform among the most urgent problems facing the nation and voiced support for a plan that would provide medical insurance for all Americans” (Bok, 1998). After getting elected as the
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