The History of Nuclear Weapons and Associated Treaties

2198 WordsJun 22, 20189 Pages
Cause of Nuclear Weapons: In 1939 just before the start of World War 2 Albert Einstein and several other scientists told the then president of the USA Franklin D. Roosevelt that Nazi Germany was putting efforts into purifying Uranium 235 which could be used to build an atomic bomb. The United States launched the Manhattan Project shortly after this which was committed to research and production that would produce a viable atomic bomb (Purohit V. 2004 Online “The Atom Bomb: A Brief History”). How a Nuclear Fission Bomb works: For a nuclear fission bomb to work the fuel needs to be kept in two subcritical mass chambers to avoid the premature detonation of the bomb. For the bomb to detonate the two subcritical masses must be brought…show more content…
Three weeks later, on the 6th of August, a gun-triggered Uranium-235 fission bomb known as “Little Boy” was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima The target had been the Aioi bridge, one of the 81 bridges connected to the 7 branched delta of the Ota River, “Little Boy” missed the target by only 800 feet (Bellis, M n.d. Online History of the Atomic Bomb & Manhattan Project). Hiroshima had a civilian population of almost 300,000 and was an important military centre, containing about 43,000 soldiers. After the explosion 66 thousand were killed and over 69 thousand were injured. (US Department of Energy, 2009) Three days after this on the 9th of August an implosion triggered Plutonium fission bomb known as “Fat Boy” was dropped on the Japanese city of Nagasaki, the primary target had been the Kokura Arsenal, a massive collection of war industries adjacent to the city of Kokura. With bad weather conditions the aircraft commander was unable to focus on a suitable target and was forced to change to their secondary target of Nagasaki. 45 thousand people were killed and over 25 thousand were injured (Bellis, M n.d. Online History of the Atomic Bomb & Manhattan Project). The next day Japan announced unconditional surrender. Almost immediately after the end of the World War II the Cold War Crisis (1951 – 1991) began; while the Cold War was mostly a war of threats between the United States and the USSR, these threats were basically the threat of complete

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