The History of the Quebec Francophones and the Attempts Made to Accommodate Their Concerns

1647 WordsJun 15, 20187 Pages
The History of the Quebec Francophones and the Attempts Made to Accommodate Their Concerns The merging of two separate and distinct groups is what has given Canada its unique cultural identity. While some early politicians believed assimilation was the best approach to building a strong Canada, it became increasing difficult to convince the Quebec francophones that a national identity should take precedence over retaining their unique culture. Opposing viewpoints and different agendas have caused mistrust among the Quebec francophones towards the federal government and mistrust among other provinces towards Quebec. Constitutional amendments have been proposed on a number of occasions and, to date, none have been successfully…show more content…
While it appears critical that Quebec be acknowledged as a distinct society, I believe it is imperative that the issue of distinctness is granted not only to Quebec but also to all of Canada's first nation people. Additional amendments to the constitution should include a provision that any group recognized as a distinct society is given the same rights as any other distinct society. While Quebec wishes to have special recognition and powers to maintain their unique cultural identity, so to should the aboriginal people of Canada. If Quebec is awarded the right to limit the use of English language in the province in favour of the French language, then the Cree of James Bay should also be granted the right to have the Cree language take priority over French and English. The Inuit and the many other aboriginal groups should also be recognized as distinct, having their own unique language and, as such, have their language and culture protected and guaranteed under the constitution. While Canada has entrenched the bilingual feature of our nation, it has failed to acknowledge that first people of Canada, had languages of their own that should be recognized and protected. Linguistic duality was embedded in the British North America Act of 1867 and has had both positive and negative repercussions for Canada. Language has evoked divisive social and political tension between French-speaking and English-speaking Canadians. (Jackson & Jackson, 1998: 230) By

More about The History of the Quebec Francophones and the Attempts Made to Accommodate Their Concerns

Open Document