Essay about The Holocaust

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The Holocaust

When the Nazis came to power in 1933, the Jews were their very first target. The infamous boycott against Jewish businesses took place in April 1933 and the first laws against the Jews were enacted as early as on April 7, 1933. Jews were progressively erased from almost every facet of German life. The Nuremberg Laws, passed in 1935, further depriving the Jews of almost every remaining right and freedom. This culminated in the bloodiest programme to date the Kristallnacht (Night of Broken Glass) in November 1938. Over 100 Jews were murdered and a "fine" was levied against the Jews in excess of 1 billion RM.

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The Communists were often explicitly targeted as well, but the
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- In the wake of the peace settlement establishing Poland at the end of World War 1, substantial numbers of Jews had immigrated to Germany. A law in July 1933 revoked the naturalization and citizenship of all of these migrants. This was followed in March 1934 by the expulsion of these immigrants.

- In September 1933 - the Reich Chamber of Culture was established; it provided the basis for excluding all non-Aryans from art, music, literature, etc. Later the same month, non-Aryans were excluded from farm labour and the ownership of farmland. In October, the exclusion was extended to journalism.

- In May 1935 - non-Aryans were excluded from the Wehrmacht and in June from the Labour Service.

(2) Hitler's hatred of Jews is known as "anti-Semitism." It has a long history in Europe and the United States. There were many anti-Semites in Europe, just as there were many racists in the United States who opposed civil rights for Afro-Americans. Hitler's hatred of Jews was so profound that several of his biographers have called it an obsession. Albert Speer, who was a close confidante to Hitler, wrote in 1977:

"The hatred of the Jews was Hitler's driving force and central point, perhaps even the only element that moved him. The German people, German greatness, the Reich, all that meant nothing to him in the final analysis.

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