The Human Factor by Graham Greene and The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro

1194 Words5 Pages
The twentieth century is the century with the greatest loss of human life in the history of civilization. It was a time of mistrust and espionage. To be loyal is defined as “faithful to one's oath, commitments, or obligations” (OED). It is not easily given, yet it can easily be lost. Two books, The Human Factor by Graham Greene and The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro show that some loyalties are bought, while others are earned. Earned loyalty tends to last while loyalty that is bought tends to fade. Through the characters Stevens and Castle, they demonstrate this difference. While both characters demonstrate external loyalty, Stevens’ loyalty was purchased, and Castle’s was earned. Castle’s genuine loyalty allows him to risk his life, while Stevens’ loyalty is only compliance. Stevens, in The Remains of the Day, lives only to serve. Whoever employs him is awarded with blind loyalty. He works tirelessly to please his master. No act is too great or small to complete. All it takes is for a wealthy man to give him his paycheck and in return they get his life. Stevens is not one to take time off. He dedicates his life to the house. His mind is always on the subject of his job. His actions all concern his role as the butler of the house. He puts it ahead of family, of love, of his morals. He lets the love of his life slip through his fingers because of his devotion to the job. He believes “a butler who is forever attempting to formulate his own 'strong

More about The Human Factor by Graham Greene and The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro

Get Access