The Impact Of 2003 And 2011 Acgme Duty Hours Requirements

3001 Words Dec 1st, 2014 13 Pages
The Impact of 2003 and 2011 ACGME Duty Hours Requirements
Their Effects on Patient Safety, Resident Education and Resident Well-Being
J.Edward Bates, M.Ed.
Texas Tech University

Abstract
In July 2003, and further defined again in July 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented duty hour requirements, based on Institute of Medicine recommendations, for all accredited GME training programs. The formation of the duty hour requirements were meant to address concerns involving patient safety, resident education and resident well-being. This literature review explores published articles that review the impact of the 2003 and 2011 ACGME duty hour requirements and their relationship to patient safety, resident education and resident well-being. Selected articles reviewed over a ten year period, 2004-2014, demonstrate varying perceptions of the duty hour requirements impact on the graduate medical education learning environment, specifically in the areas of quality of resident education, appropriate resident supervision and transitions of care. The Impact of 2003 and 2011 ACGME Duty Hours Requirements
Their Effects on Patient Safety, Resident Education and Resident Well-Being
Work hours of graduate medical education (GME) residents, more commonly known as duty hours, has long been a concern of the public. Long duty hours have been associated with medical errors, resident burn-out and poor quality of life for GME trainees. Prior to…
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