The Impact Of Corporate Social Responsibility On Buying Behavior

1283 Words6 Pages
Mohr, L. A., Webb, D. J., & Harris, K. E. (2001). Do Consumers Expect Companies to be Socially Responsible? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Buying Behavior. Journal Of Consumer Affairs, 35(1), 45.
This article examines whether or not corporate social responsibility affect purchasing decisions by reviewing surveys and implementing an experiment. Afterwards, researchers examined the data to determine if corporate social responsibility affects consumer behavior. Both methods were integral to come up with a substantial conclusion. Whereas the surveys allowed the researchers to measure the number of consumer that are affected by socially responsible, the experiment establish to what degree these consumers are affected. This
…show more content…
I plan to use these findings to increase my knowledge on consumer comportment and as guide to form my own experiment.

Mohr, L. A., & Webb, D. J. (2005). The Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility and Price on Consumer Responses. Journal Of Consumer Affairs, 39(1), 121-147.
In this study, Mohr and Webb attempted to determine weather or not a company’s social responsibility actions encourage consumers support and to what degree price affects such consumer’s purchase decisions. To answer these two questions, they conducted an experiment in which respondents were informed about corporate social responsibility and prices of goods that extending from low to high. Afterwards, buying intent was calculated with survey that questioned whether or not respondents would pay for various products at different prices from different corporations. By examining corporate social responsibility as an independent variables and purchase intention as the dependent variable, researchers inferred that businesses’ ethical action do prompt customers to purchase their products. Yet, prices also affected consumer behavior; the effects of it were stronger when corporations’ ethical actions were low and/or non-existent. This study not only used psychology to accurately code the surveys and categorize consumers’ conduct patterns, but also incorporated the discipline of economics to attach a theoretical price on consumer goods. This article answers in part my own research and will
Get Access