The Impact Of World Music On Music And Culture

1168 WordsOct 24, 20145 Pages
Jongseok Kim Ethnomusicology 25 Professor Ruskin 24 October 2014 Paper 1 The following readings from Bohlman, Byrne, and Fairley emphasize world music and globalization. According to Bohlman, world music is music people face ubiquitously, and includes popular, folk and art music practiced by either professionals or amateurs; it may be Western or non-Western, acoustic, electronic, and so on. Bohlman notes that world music can be marketable, profane, or sacred, and that musicians may highlight genuineness while greatly relying on media to propagate it to as many markets as they can. The consumers of world music may accept the music as however they may please, thus essentially world music is anything people may want to classify it as, as it…show more content…
Such view shows a positive implication as optimists finds such hybridity a fundament of music broadening out into history and culture, and the growing interest and development of music amongst people. Ultimately, Fairley notes of Jowers’ conclusion that world music in turn brings serious attentiveness to present economic and political matters, and the role of the West in enduring exploitation. Moreover, according to Byrne, world music is a term that typically refers to non-Western popular, traditional, and classical music. He notes that world music is a marketing and “pseudomusical” term. He thinks the use of the term—world music—is merely a “label for anything that is not sung in English or anything that does not fit into the present Anglo-Western pop music.” Fairley notes that local and global are not merely contrasting descriptive terms, but rather “different perspectives of the same process” (Fairley 273). Fairley states that in straightforward analytic terms, ‘global’ and ‘local’ are vague terms with numerous vantage points. He further discusses of the Cooder Paradigm, which can be explained as a confrontation between local musicians and musicians with global reputation. He notes that local musicians are musicians known only within their own geographically defined market, whereas global musicians are those who bring attention to the global audience (Fairley 283).
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