The Impact of the Industrial Revolution on Western Society

1367 WordsApr 5, 20086 Pages
The Industrial Revolution had a significant impact on Western society and the effects were numerous and mainly positive. The Industrial Revolution began in England in the 1790’s and spread throughout Europe and eventually to America. The extensive effects of the Industrial Revolution influenced almost every aspect of daily life and human society in some way. During this time period, widespread transportation such as railroads became available and important for the movement of goods and people. Also, new social reforms came about, dealing with critical issues including that of child labor. In addition, the effects of the revolution resulted in a great improvement in living standards for many people. Although the positive affects of the…show more content…
Furthermore, set the minimum age for a child to legally work at 9 and stated that children 9-13 were not allowed to work for more than twelve hours a day. The act also set guidelines as to what children were permitted to do while working. The Mines Act of 1842 set the regulation that no female or boy under ten years of age was to be employed underground in the mines. The factory acts allowed for a more modern day pattern of work in which men were expecting to be the main wage earners. The Industrial Revolution increased the awareness of human rights of women and children, and therefore, accelerated the process of equality in society. An additional effect of the Industrial Revolution on Western society was the improvement in living standards for people. The invention of the steam engine, run by coal, allowed factories to be located in cities and no longer by water. This resulted in people flocking to these densely populated cities for job opportunities and in turn, eventually led to bad living conditions for many of the inhabitants. It was believed filthy living conditions in cities were a chief cause of epidemic diseases such as cholera. In addition, overcrowded, disease-ridden slums were viewed as dangerous to physical health, moral health, and political
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