The Importance Of Restraint And Its Effects On The Individual

2174 WordsNov 20, 20169 Pages
This allows a person who lacks the capacity to be prevented from harm by depriving them of their liberty but must be in their best interest. For example, securing a building with locks or door codes, use of bedrails, one to one supervision or physical restraining (Social Care Institute for Excellence 2015). However, Watson (2001) expressed that using restraint has both psychological and physical effects on the individual. The various types of restraint mentioned above can cause harmful effect instead of preventing harm and suggest that nurses need to put in place an individualised care plan which would identify a person’s needs and appropriate interventions rather than the use of restraint. Furthermore, the MHA states that a person who as a result of mental health disorders can be sectioned if they pose a risk either to themselves or the community. This involves admission to the hospital for mental health treatment which might be against their will. Before a person is sectioned, an assessment would be carried out to explore the person’s mental state (Department of health 2015 and Rethink mental illness 2014). Pandarakalam (2015) takes the stance that, MHA protects vulnerable adults and the community. It enables them to gain back control over their lives and deterioration is prevented as a result of compulsory admission. Nevertheless, sectioning of patients can lead to suicidal attempts, feeling more depressed and being stigmatised. But to determine if an individual lacks
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