The Influence Of The Salem Witch Trials

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Roger Conant, along with other immigrants from Cape Ann, Massachusetts, founded a sizable town in Massachusetts in 1626 which they referred to as Naumkeag. However, these Puritan immigrants desired a name which better reflected their hopes for their new home and their strong beliefs (http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h2229.html). Eventually, the name Naumkeag faded away and the settlers referred to their town as Salem which biblestudytools.com defines as “Complete or perfect peace” (http://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionary/salem/). In light of the events just 67 years later, this name is tragically ironic as the town will forever be remembered for anything but peace and tranquility.
From 1692 to 1693, Salem was home to a series of court trials which is now referred to as the Salem Witch Trials (Cite Smithsonian). During this time, a group of young girls ranging from ages seven to sixteen were brought in as witnesses to the practice of witchcraft in the community. The girls convulse, have delusions, scream out, and claim to be coerced by the devil. These children, lead by a particularly devious teen named Abigail, claimed that these afflictions were due to witchcraft practiced by people in the community. Over the course of two years, 200 people were accused of engaging in witchcraft. Of the accused, nineteen were hanged and one had stones piled on top of him until he died (http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h2229.html).
The Salem Witch Trials have been studied tirelessly since
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