The Invasion of D-Day Essay

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Introduction
The invasion of D-Day is the largest joint sea born invasion in the history of the world. Although very well planned, the amphibious landings were a gamble made by the Allied forces to gain foothold in Europe. Every American has heard about the Allied invasion of German-occupied Western Europe on D-Day. However, how many Americans stop and think about how much planning, preparation and luck that went into making it the success that it is remembered for? I will attempt to depict what it took to conquer the Normandy beaches using historical and military facts that make it such an iconic event in the world’s history still today.

History
Japan’s surprise attack on the United States came as a complete shock. The attacks cost
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Introduction
The invasion of D-Day is the largest joint sea born invasion in the history of the world. Although very well planned, the amphibious landings were a gamble made by the Allied forces to gain foothold in Europe. Every American has heard about the Allied invasion of German-occupied Western Europe on D-Day. However, how many Americans stop and think about how much planning, preparation and luck that went into making it the success that it is remembered for? I will attempt to depict what it took to conquer the Normandy beaches using historical and military facts that make it such an iconic event in the world’s history still today.

History
Japan’s surprise attack on the United States came as a complete shock. The attacks cost the nation 18 warships, 164 aircraft, and more than 2,400 lives.1 The next day President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed congress asking for a declaration of war on Japan, labeling their attack “…a day which will live on in infamy”.2 The declaration was passed on 8 December 1941. Three days later, Germany and Italy, Japans’ allies, declared war on the United States on 11 December 1941.3
In December 1941, Hitler gave a speech boasting that he controlled all of the western coast of Europe. He then said “It is my unshakeable decision to make this front impregnable against every enemy”.4 He then started construction on 15,000 strongpoints that he manned with 300,000 troops. This stretch of 1,670 miles became known as the “Atlantic Wall”. The

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