The Journalism Feeds On Curiosity

955 WordsAug 1, 20164 Pages
Journalism feeds on curiosity. One week I am fact-checking a story on rock climbing for Outside magazine, and the next week I find myself on top of a 40-foot wall. Every news assignment becomes a crash course in a new subject. Every idea for a feature leads to twenty more questions and ten more stories. Journalism is an addictive adventure — an adventure I’ve known I wanted to pursue since I was in kindergarten. Yet instead of feeling like I’ve been stuck on the same career path for 16 years, I feel like each day, each article, is a new venture. I am pursuing a master’s in International Politics at Trinity College Dublin because the heart of journalism isn’t in the writing or the editing — it’s how well you know the topics on which you are reporting. Shortly after entering college, I found a second love in political science, and my academic interests began to merge with my passion for the news. I am now working toward a career as political reporter, and more specifically, an international correspondent who serves to connect readers in the U.S. to European news. Ultimately, I hope to be the chief of a news bureau in a large European capital such as Dublin or Belfast. My interest in foreign policy and international affairs sparked even more adventures, from researching education policy in Santiago, Chile, to nervously teaching a room of fellow undergraduates for the first time. Following my first year at college, I jumped on the opportunity to take an internship with a
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