"The Journey of Crazy Horse" by Joseph M Marshall III The book report was a summary and response/reaction paper to the Lakota History of Crazy Horse.

2056 Words Sep 30th, 2008 9 Pages
The Journey of Crazy HorseThe first seven chapters begin by talking about the early years of Crazy Horse. These years are significant because it shows how he began his life before he went off to fight mighty battles and became known as an excellent warrior. There are many main points in his early years that lead up to him becoming a warrior. Starting off with his birth and childhood, how he learned different virtues, to finally becoming interested in being a warrior. Each time he was involved with killing a white man or protecting the Lakota during a war, helped him in becoming more of a warrior and leader of his people. Then he was also involved in rescuing people from the white man and by doing this, it had proved that the virtues he had …show more content…
His experience at aiming also grew quickly, instead of aiming at the hoop rolling around he was taught that grasshoppers were targets that would teach him even more about hunting. Flying grasshoppers helped the Light Haired one become faster and helped perfect his aim. It was not only the interest that he found in grasshoppers but also the other animals that taught him many lessons in living and hunting. His mentors were the animals, each teaching him different skills and living habits that helped him in his hunting and his knowledge of what it did for him, his family and his community by keeping an abundance of food.

As Light Hair grew older his strengths shown greatly to his teachers, he never would give up. He was taught how to use each weapon and which would help him in what situation. Along with all of his strategy and strengths, he was taught of certain things that would help him in his journeys, friendship and leadership. Light hair was also taught many new things that would help him in the leadership he is known for today.

In 1851 the Fort Laramie Treaty was formed, over eight thousand men, women and children came together and formed an alliance. Enemies, relatives and families came together to form nearly three hundred of their soldiers. Man was beginning to intrude on the land of the Indians and the Indians knew they had to do something. Many enemies became friends, which would also help their future as tribes.…

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