The Key Concepts Of Psychoanalysis By Sigmund Freud

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Psychoanalysis was founded by Sigmund Freud (1856-1939). It is also known as Insight-orientated therapy. The aim of psychoanalysis therapy is to make the unconscious conscious. Our unconscious mind is where we keep our deep dark demons that we do not want to face. So, psychoanalytic therapy forces the patient to tap into these unconscious feelings through techniques such as free association, dream analysis and transference. There are several key concepts in psychoanalytic theory for us to remember in order to understand the psychoanalytic theory. The First key concept was that people are deterministic which means they are wired at birth. Corey(2009) stated that people are influence by instincual drives. And they are born with…show more content…
This psychosexual theory of Sigmund Freud consists of five stages which are oral, anal, phallic, latent and lastly genital stages. Oral stages starts at the first year of life. If babies would not get their instinctual drive fully in this stage they will later in life develop oral fixation. Not only the baby gets nutrients from sucking from its mother but also create a bond between them. Failure in this stage will later result in life as failure in the forming relationship. The anal stage occurs at 18 months to 3 years of life. The anal stage which occurs in toddlers can subdivided into two phases which are anal expulsion, the expressive period in which the child derives pleasure in expelling feces and the retention period known as anal retention, in which they derive pleasure from storing it. "The anal stage coincides with toilet training in the child"(Priestley,…show more content…
Also, there are some differences between how the relationship between therapist and client in classical and contemporary psychoanalytic theory. The classical analyst would praise the role of the expert by standing outside the relationship, comments on it, and offers insight-producing interpretations. Whereas, contemporary psychoanalyst involve with the client more than classical analyst. They think that the relationship of the client and therapist would not grow if it detached and nonparticipating. Therefore, contemporary therapists view their emotional communication with clients as a useful way to gain information and create connection (Luborsky et al., 2011). Another difference between classical and contemporary psychoanalytic theory would be that classical theory would focus on the root of the problem which emerge from the past childhood experiences of the unconscious mind of the client whereas for contemporary theory would not only focus on the past experiences of the client but also focus on the present problems of the client. Therefore, the therapeutic relationship would not be productive if they therapist would be in the expert role and not involve in this therapeutic relationship in contemporary psychoanalytic
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