The Literature On Anticipated Vs. Unanticipated Death And Their Corresponding Coping Skills

1494 WordsOct 9, 20166 Pages
Research Report: Review of the Literature on Anticipated vs. Unanticipated Death and their Corresponding Coping Skills Emily Pekarek and Peyton Flewelling University of Missouri at Columbia Research Report: Review of the Literature on Anticipated vs. Unanticipated Grief and their Corresponding Coping Skills Death is a universally experienced phenomenon. In the United States alone, over 2.6 million people die each year (Center for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2015). For practitioners, it is of utmost importance to better understand the process of grief to develop better interventions for bereaved individuals. Death can be divided into two broad categories: anticipated and unanticipated. As cited in Bouchal, Rallison, Moules, and Sinclair (2015), Aldrich (1974) defines anticipatory grief (AG) as “any grief occurring prior to a loss, as distinguished from the grief which occurs at or after a loss.” (p.44). Similarly, as noted in Al-Gamal and Long (2010), Worden (2003) defines AG as “an active process of grieving that occurs prior to actual loss” (p.1981) Reynolds and Botha (2006) mention Clayton’s (1973) definition of unanticipated death (UD) as less than 5 days, while Merriam Webster (2016) defines unanticipated as “not expected or anticipated”. Grief that results from this type of death is unanticipated grief (UG). INSERT BIT ABOUT COPING SKILLS??? Literature Review History of anticipated grief Our understanding of grief came fairly
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