“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot is a widely studied and analyzed modernist

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“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot is a widely studied and analyzed modernist poem. This poem is one that many high school students are subjected to, leading to an overall displeasure for “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” However, those that revisit the poem are more inclined to enjoy and analyze the poem, finding an interest in the character of J. Alfred Prufrock. Charles C. Walcutt is one of the many individuals fueled to provide a deeper analysis of this text and in his contribution to the November edition of College English, an essay entitled “Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,"” he addresses his impression that the “Love Song” portion of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” has been neglected and what…show more content…
He is on the boarders of society and can never quite step inside. He realizes that he is not meant to be popular or the star of the show. Prufrock is content to be of any use, complaisant in his position. He states that he could almost even be considered a Fool. He is caught in a cyclical mental state, always hypersensitive to anything that draws his attention back to his aging body. He can hear the song of the mermaids calling out and knows that it is not him that they seek, for they have no reason to desire him.
In the November 1957 edition of College English, a professional journal for college professors, Charles Child Walcutt offered an interesting approach to “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” published in the section of the journal entitled Round Table, an area for discussion and comment on live topics. In his discussion of the poem, titled “Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,"” Walcutt addresses the neglect of the “love song” part of the poem title. According to Walcutt, the majority of analyses in regards to the “love song” portion of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” focus on Prufrock’s exclusive fixation on himself. Walcutt proposes that Prufrock is, in all actuality, planning to propose marriage to the woman with the shawl that he observes in the ninth stanza. Walcutt suggests that this is the question that Prufrock has been trying to gain the courage to ask, yet shies away from.
On the day the reader is witnessing, he says that
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