Essay about The Making of "You" as a Student

1438 WordsMar 6, 20146 Pages
EDCX246 Assignment 1a As a primary school student growing up in a major agricultural town, I can say with certainty that my school was one of mostly ‘Conservative’ orientation, but with an undercurrent of ‘Liberal’. I believe this largely influenced my identity, and led to a specific construction of child (Jones, 2011). This essay will discuss how a predominantly ‘Conservative’ orientation unintentionally shaped my childhood and adolescence, affected my views and expectations of sex and gender, and formed my idea of sexuality. I attended a Co-Educational Catholic School in Moree, New South Wales. Being a student at a Catholic school in a Cotton-growing town, the approach was one that took a majorly ‘Conservative’ orientation –…show more content…
The idea that gender is constructed within the institutional and cultural contexts (Connell, 2002) was echoed throughout the gender-specific employment roles of the school. The prevalence of female teachers (Connell, 2002) including the staff of the office, majority of the teachers, canteen/volunteer parents, librarians, and even cleaners; male staff, however were more relied upon for roles such as principal, groundskeepers, and the specialist teachers (i.e. maths, and physical education). This ensured that as students we were exposed to both male and female staff, but it was reinforcing the nurturing, ‘traditional’ role of women as teachers, and showing the powerful and more specific roles men can hold in a workplace and society in general. As younger students the idea of ‘sexuality/sex’ was considered taboo, and strictly off-limits. Topics of sex, any mention, or any inquiry into the idea of sex were gasped at and dismissed by teachers – we were too innocent and vulnerable to know of such things. It was seen as inappropriate to discuss these issues in the school community (Jones, 2011). It was only in late Stage 3 that the topic of sexuality was approached – through intensive after-school information sessions with parents, and through very limited PDHPE education. These were very
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