The Men Who Knew Two Much A Compairson of Hitchocks Classic Original and Remake

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The Men Who Knew Two Much A Compairson of Hitchocks Classic Original and Remake Many works of art can be considered artifacts that hold volumes of information regarding the culture of the people that created them and the historical context in which they lived.

Films are also treasures of culture, filled with clues and insights into the attitudes and perceptions of the people of the day. While documentary films obviously present a historical record of people and events, dramatic fictional movies can also reveal the same. Comparing the main characters in Hitchcock's 1934

The Man Who knew Too Much with their 1955 counterparts unveils many differences between American and English cultures, expectations of their women
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However, the Dreightons were more deceptive, both as trusting tourists in the beginning and later posing as clergy. This difference in the identity of the villain might be attributed to the post-WWII climate as Russia, America's ally 10 years previous, was now (1955) our bitter enemy. What may seem like a friend can turn out to be something very different.

THE HEROINES [top]

Ultimately, it was the depiction of the two heroines and how they reacted to their child's kidnapping that revealed the most about their respective cultural values and expectations. In 1934, Jill was a witty and sardonic Brit who hid her emotions and seemed very independent. At first, she was flirtatious and joked about Betty being a "little wretch." After the kidnapping, she was overcome by emotion - but only in the privacy of her daughter's room. After much pleading, she was finally convinced by Clive to pull herself together and be strong before showing her face again. In this scene, Jill's re-connection with reality was signified by her noticing that a particular car was on the wrong toy train. This moment seemed almost liken to the Buddhist concept of living in the now. Another scene just before the final shoot-out showed the police having a pleasant cup of tea. This is a British characteristic instead of one grounded in the time context of the Thirties. In times of chaos or crisis, the Brits do not respond emotionally, rather, they focus on a simple reality such as tea to
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