The Mexican Revolution In The Death Of Artemio Cruz . The

2007 WordsApr 26, 20179 Pages
The Mexican Revolution in The Death of Artemio Cruz The Death of Artemio Cruz was written by Carlos Fuentes in 1962. This novel is based around Cruz’s early, heroic crusades during the Mexican Revolution. It is a journey from Cruz’s corrupt climb from poverty to wealth as a hacienda owner after the war, to his anguished present life as an old man looking back on his past and sees a long life filled with violence of many kinds. To ensure his position in a wealthy land-owning family, Cruz blackmails a fellow soldier and blackmails the man’s sister into marriage. He quickly becomes a wealthy, arrogant, deceitful crook—the exact type of people that he fought against during the revolution. Throughout Cruz’s long life he continues to gain…show more content…
During the early 1950s he was press secretary for the United Nations Information Center in Mexico City and secretary in the Bureau of Cultural Diffusion at the university. (Gyurko) Carlos Fuentes was involved in the government asspets of Mexico as well, so he was aware of the economies state back in the Mexican Revolution War. Even after hundreds of years, the Mexican Revolution remains an important mark in Mexican politics. Adams believes Carlos Fuentes is trying to say in The Death of Artemio Cruz by saying this, What he seems to be saying in this extraordinary novel is not only that the 1911 revolution has come to a dead end, but also (and more important) that, given man’s nature, Marxist solutions are facing the same blank wall. He proposes an existentialist way out, but his sense of courage is greater than his suggested submission to man’s apparent destiny. (Adams) The Mexican Revolution lasted more than a decade (1910-24). The Revolution led to consecutive Mexican turmoil, from civil conflicts in the 1920s to radical economic changes in the 1930s. The novel takes place during the Revolution War, and this is what encyclodedia has to say about the Mexican Revolution, During the war years, the number of men-in-arms at any one time was never great. In 1915, the most factious year, fewer than 100,000

More about The Mexican Revolution In The Death Of Artemio Cruz . The

Open Document