The Monster Is A Bad Monster In Frankenstein

837 Words4 Pages
In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Frankenstein’s Monster or ‘Daemon’ (50) is displayed as horrible, violent creature, that wanders around, only to cause destruction and despair. It is often said, that his life is all about causing misery in his creator’s life. But was he designed violent and hostile, or did he learn such behaviour not only from his creator but every other human being he came across? Apart from Frankenstein’s negative attitude towards his creation, there are some indications that the monster is a pleasant and gentle creature, who only became what he was in the end through negative influences from his few interactions with humans. Learning, according to the Differential Association Theory, is an ‘activity
[…] accomplished, in
…show more content…
Whereas, those human beings able to see his countenance had a ‘fatal prejudice cloud[s] their eyes’ (Shelley, 93). Thus, every other direct contact with individuals was distinguished by fear and hatred. Whenever the monster came near humans ‘the children shrieked and […] the women fainted’ (Shelley, 73). Those people believed that the monster wanted nothing but to harm them (Shelley, 94). Even when he wanted to rescue a woman, who was drowning, he was met with violence when a man saw the monster near the woman and believed he wanted to murder her (Shelley,99). This particular man ‘aimed a gun, which he carried, at [his] body, and fired’ (Shelley, 99). As Cressey says ‘criminal behaviour is learned in interaction with persons’ (2), Frankenstein’s monster was influenced by those interactions with humans, which ‘spurned and deserted’ him (Shelley, 97). Therefore, he was driven to the point when he swore, abandoned by all human beings, ‘eternal hatred and vengeance to all mankind’ (Shelley, 99). In other words, due to all his negative and violent encounters, Frankenstein’s monster learned to meet people with cruelty
Get Access