The Montessori Curriculum Model Is Based On The Philosophy Of Continuous Development

904 WordsOct 26, 20164 Pages
The Montessori Curriculum Model Dina Fikeru, Evealin Cruz, Olga Cruz, Althea Robinson, Talaya Thompson Montessori Curriculum 1. Underlying Philosophy Montessori education curriculum is based on the philosophy of continuous development, love, caring and uniqueness. In the Montessori classroom, every child is provided with unique opportunities to develop both moral and cognitive skills in areas that motivate students (Isaacs, 2015). For example, if a child loves construction, the teacher may provide construction materials such as small boxes, tapes and superglue that is necessary for assembling the boxes together. This makes learning both interactive and enjoyable. The role of significant adults such as teachers is to provide guidance on what the child should do to realize his/her goals (Isaacs, 2015). For example, if the child is defeated on how to assemble the boxes, the teacher should guide the child until the child has fully mastered the task. 2. Historical Perspectives The history of Montessori’s curriculum dates back to 1906 when Maria Montessori founded the first Children’s House by the name Casa dei Bambini in Rome, Italy (Isaacs, 2015). It was in this children’s house that Maria developed a keen interest on how children develop their cognitive abilities and moral behavior. She realized that every child possesses unique skills and talents that should not be generalized in a single classroom (Ansari &Winsler, 2014). In other words, Montessori

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