The Occupational Safety And Health Administration

968 WordsSep 5, 20164 Pages
Introduction Violence in the workplace has been an increasing problem for many years, but it is hitting the healthcare profession hardest.(1) Nearly 24,000 assaults in the work environment occur every year, with nearly 75% occuring to healthcare providers.(2) In 2001, it was reported that physicians were assaulted at a rate of 16.2 assaults per 1,000 physicans, nurses were assualted at a rate of 21.9 assaults per 1,000 nurses, and other healthcare workers (with varying job titles) were assaulted at a rate of 8.5 assaults per 1,000 employees.(3) In 2004, it was documented that as many as 14% of doctors and 40% of nurses in a UK survey reported being assaulted in the year prior. (4) The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has defined workplace violence as “violence or the threat of violence against workers. It can occur at or outside the workplace and can range from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and homicide.” (5) The US Bureau of Justice defines workplace violence as “nonfatal violence (rape/sexual assualt, robbery, and aggravated and simple assault) against employed persons age 16 or older that occurred while they were at work or on duty.”(1) Previous research on the topic of workplace violence in healthcare often lacks the ability to be directly compared due to a lack of definition consensus. In 2000, Rippon defined aggression as “behavior with intent that is directed at doing harm to a living being whether harm results or not, or with
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