Essay about The Ocean Environment

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Ocean Environment

The sea is the most obvious feature of the earth's surface.
Approximately seventy percent of this surface is covered by water, in one way or another. Beneath this water are the familiar sands of the beaches, bottoms of bays, and the inshore ocean. Farther offshore this water covers an amazing submarine topography of underwater canyons, trenches, mountains, and plains.
Unlike the continents, which are physically separated from one another, the oceans are continuous and interconnected. Since the "world ocean is continuous"(M.J. Keen) it has similar characteristics throughout. In the early
1870s oceanographers collected seawater samples from all of the seas of the world at a variety
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They all have crests, troughs, wave heights, lengths, and periods. Also, water particles that make up the waves all move in identical orbital patterns. The orbital pattern is up and forward in the crest and down and back in the trough. It is only when the wave becomes unstable that the orbital motion is destroyed. The water particles then begin to move at the same speed as the moving wave form.
Breaking waves release a tremendous amount of stored energy on a beach face. This energy moves the sand about and changes the configuration of the bottom. As the bottom configuration is changed by the waves, it changes the characteristics of incoming waves. This interaction between the waves and the bottom results in the beach face having an everlasting wave pattern.
Everything in the universe is composed of extremely small paritcles called atoms, which are often bonded together to form molecules. Molecules are formed as the result fo the transfer of electrons between atoms. The complete loss and gain of electrons results in the formation of ionic molecules, which have completely positive and negative vegions. Unequal sharing of electrons, on the other hand, characterizes the polar covalent molecules, which have only partially positive and negative regions. The
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