The Outcome Of World War Ii Was In Question. Germany Still

1582 WordsJan 6, 20177 Pages
The outcome of World War II was in question. Germany still had a stronghold in most of Europe. The Allies had not made much ground in their offensive in Italy, and now turned to the beaches of Normandy in France. Success in World War 2 now depended on our ability to successfully take over the beaches in Normandy. The Landing of Normandy was the turning point of the war because the Allies had landed in Occupied Europe, had a surplus of soldiers and supplies, and Germany was now on the retreat. Method Participants Up until June 6, 1944 the Allies had made little ground in Europe. They landed in Italy in 1943 but they had very little success. The allies needed to get a better foothold in Europe and this was the way to do it. The code name for…show more content…
By the time of the invasion took place only 17% of the fortifications had been established. Another setback for the Germans on D-Day was most of their tanks were stationed miles back from the beach, and the only person who could tell the tanks to move into action was Hitler. But it was early in the morning and everyone was too afraid to wake Hitler up. Moreover when Hitler did finally mobilize the tank units, the Allies had destroyed many bridges and roadways delaying the time it took for the tanks to reach the frontlines. At the time D-Day was the largest naval, air, and land operation in history. It took great cooperation between all the countries who were involved with the Allies. Some were afraid to go ahead with the plan, and said to continue the fight in Italy. They were worried because they knew the losses that would take place and wanted their soldiers to be safe. However they knew it was a necessity and knew they needed to listen and follow the command of the of their supreme leaders. "In a war such as this, when high command invariably involves a president, a prime minister, six chiefs of staff, and a horde of lesser 'planners, ' there has got to be a lot of patience, no one person can be a Napoleon or a Caesar." --General Dwight D. Eisenhower, diary entry, February 23, 1942 The five beaches that were invaded were Omaha, Utah, Gold, Juno, and Sword. Each beach has its unique challenges, that delayed or hampered the
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