The Parables, By Jeanette Winterson, And The Whitbread Award For Best First Fiction

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Sometimes in order to prevail a message, it is necessary to provide more than just direct context is required. Authors will use anecdotes in order to teach a lesson, often in terms of religious lessons. These parables add insight to the writing by mirroring characters in an abstract style. Fictional short stories have a way of relating to the actual writing. There is generally a connection with the characters in the short story, with the main characters.They will follow a similar journey, needing to make alike moral decisions. The characters in the parables can be used to display the choices the real characters need to make. How the parable ends reflects a possible ending for the real character, although they can be interpreted different ways. Jeanette Winterson, winner of the Whitbread Award for Best First Fiction, for her book Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, uses many parables. Jeanette grew up with a world explained through religious stories. Everything she knew originated from the bible. Even simple events such as when she would “climb to the top of the hill and look down, [she could] see everything, just like Jesus on the pinnacle….” (Winterson, 5). All that she knew related, and reflected the stories from God. This explains why using parables throughout her book Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit appropriately sets the scene establishes the tone. The parables clarify her spiritual journey, while simultaneously highlighting her feminist persona. Winterson uses both male

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