The Patriot Act: Necessary Or Ineffective?

2099 Words9 Pages
This significance of this decision is explained by the fact that the true problem lies ahead and will thus be affected by it. An independent security researcher Graham Cluley points out that “it will be a different technology company having demands made of it - perhaps a company which doesn't have as much of a backbone (or the legal funds) that Apple did." He expresses his concerns that in the future the FBI will encounter a situation in which they are not able to get what they want and will consequently drive software engineers to go against their ethical standards and perform tasks that would jeopardize the privacy and security of millions [8]. Apple’s insistence on privacy has protected smaller companies that might not have the finances…show more content…
It essentially boils down to these “other purposes” which allow the government nearly unrestricted surveillance of citizens’ sensitive personal information. Statistically speaking, the Patriot Act has been completely ineffective. Between the year 2003 and 2006 there were almost 200,000 FBI requests made to obtain personal information yielding only one single terror-related conviction that would have occurred without the Patriot Act. Moreover, of the almost 4,000 “Sneak & Peak” searches made in 2010, less than one percent were terror-related [9]. Statistically speaking, this phone would not have revealed any valuable information. Additionally, the government has allegedly retrieved the data but has not released any other statements regarding the information thus challenging its assumed…show more content…
There are several positive uses of big data including the development of more accurate weather prediction systems, research and production of self-driving vehicles, making cities smarter, and collecting more data during exercise in order to train in the most efficient way. The essential item in keeping this straight is striving to develop policies that reflect our ideals and then implementing it. This falls on the shoulders of the government. Minimizing the gap between the implementation and policy can be achieved through various venues. Transparency is of paramount importance when dealing with surveillance and entrusting other entities with personal information. If any person is being spied on or having information collected, they should know about it and of course it should be legal. Google as a service is a good example. Although using Google’s services are “free” to use, it sells our personal information to other companies for surveillance capitalism and marketing. Google should have an agreement or make it clearly known that this is what is happening and then provide an option to pay for its services directly and not disclose user’s information. Additionally, companies that participate in such behaviors should be legally bound with well-defined terms and be regularly
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