The Perceived Challenges of Women in Leadership Positions That Prevents Them from Climbing the Corporate Ladder

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The Perceived Challenges of Women in Leadership Positions That Prevents Them from Climbing the Corporate Ladder Introduction For years, women have encountered gender bias in the corporate environment. Men have dominated the workplace making it difficult for women to advance in power and leadership. Gender bias has become problematic for the career oriented women creating barriers such as stereotyping, job advancement, power imbalance, and unequal wages. Hymowitz and Schellhardt (1986) described the challenges as invisible barriers, the glass ceiling that prevents women from advancing to a certain level in various institutions. Arfken, Bellar, and Helms (2004) defined it as an invisible barrier that prevents minorities and women from…show more content…
The term old boy network society refers to a selective informal network connecting members of a social class or profession or organization with the intention of offering relationships, information, and favors for example business and politics (Dictionary.com (n. d.). Deaux (1994) put on the gender lenses that highlighted gender bias within the organization. She focuses on three gender lenses 1) androcentrism, 2) gender polarization, and 3) biological essentialism. With the terms androcentrism referring to “the acceptance of men and the male experience as the standard by which all other events are gauged”; gender polarization referring to the “belief that men and women stand in opposition to each other”; and biological essentialism basing the logic that “if men and women have fundamental, biological differences, then some will argue that the treatment are not only justified and inevitable” (p. 1). Debates dated back in the 19th century argued the appropriateness of women’s education in the 20th century. Bem (1993) also argued the differences between men and women were present “throughout the history of the Western culture” (p. 1). In agreement with both Bem (1993) and Deaux (1994), the sexual differences as axiomatic stating that both androcentrism and gender polarization need to be eradicated since there is no evidence to show that male are more effective as leaders than women. Race, Gender and Power Issues

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