The Perfect and the Innocent: Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

1340 Words 6 Pages
Perfection is a house on it’s own, but innocence is the landscape around it. The author of Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger, tells an interesting story about a boy who has avoided his home after getting kicked out his fourth school. This boy, Holden Caulfield, loves perfection and innocence. Holden is a strange character, he makes a snowball, but can’t throw it, imagines the museum as a perfect place because things don’t change, daydreams about his childhood sweetheart constantly, and after seeing “F” you written on the walls of the school, Holden tries to erase every one of them. Life for Holden is sad and uplifting at the same time, but he has to face the fact that he is growing up and can’t be the protector of children. Holden …show more content…
Perfection is a house on it’s own, but innocence is the landscape around it. The author of Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger, tells an interesting story about a boy who has avoided his home after getting kicked out his fourth school. This boy, Holden Caulfield, loves perfection and innocence. Holden is a strange character, he makes a snowball, but can’t throw it, imagines the museum as a perfect place because things don’t change, daydreams about his childhood sweetheart constantly, and after seeing “F” you written on the walls of the school, Holden tries to erase every one of them. Life for Holden is sad and uplifting at the same time, but he has to face the fact that he is growing up and can’t be the protector of children. Holden tries to imagine that everything is perfect and the children are innocent without realizing the truth.

Early in the book, while Holden is still in Pencey, he takes a snowball and something quite odd and remarkable. Holden picks up snow, makes a snowball, looks at a car, gets ready to throw it, but he doesn’t because “the car looks so nice and white” (Salinger 36). Holden then decided he should throw it at a fire hydrant “but, it looked too nice and white, too” (Salinger 36). Both of these things were too perfect for Holden to destroy. If Holden didn’t want things to stay the same, he would have thrown the snowball maybe not at the car, but at least the fire hydrant. Holden then attempted to get on the bus, but the bus driver said he
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