The Persasiveness o Maternal Bonds in The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

2926 Words Feb 19th, 2018 12 Pages
She engages her readers through the mind of a socially awkward women named Eleanor, who was ultimately victimized by her mother, and now seeks to gain a maternal acceptance, a fundamental need or vital blood connection. Eleanor seeks to fulfill herself by obtaining that motherly bond or that “cup of stars” which makes her human—an individual identity with a sense of belonging in the world. Hill House then targets Eleanor’s vulnerability, her desperate need for maternal acceptance, and presents itself as a tempting illusion—a mother, someone who loves her, a place where she can belong—to her. Roberta Rubenstein strongly explicates the idea of Hill House representing a parental figure, which according to her, poses as both “an enticing yet devouring mother” with a preoedipal love interest (Rubenstein). Yet, there is a situational irony taking place; Jackson presents the text to us in a way in which we can see Hill House’s evil attributes, while in turn, Eleanor decides to foolishly ignore them, and the house begins to consume her as a result. And just as Eleanor is both enticed and repulsed by the house, so are we. We recognize its evil appearance, and know it represents a form of danger, and yet we slowly grow…

More about The Persasiveness o Maternal Bonds in The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

Open Document