The Philosophical and Sociological Developments for Bebop During the 1940's

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The Philosophical and Sociological Developments for Bebop During the 1940's When discussing the history of Jazz, an important type of music is developed that changed the music industry. This music, bebop, helped to influence other types of music, and it also let us appreciate jazz more As is so often the case in jazz, when a style or way of playing becomes too commercialized, the evolution turned in the opposite direction. A group of musicians, who had something new to say, something definitely new, found each other reacting against the general Swing fashion. This new music developed, at first in spurts, originally in Kansas City and then most of all in musician's hangouts in Harlem, particularly at Minton's Playhouse, and…show more content…
This was later to become the real genius of modern jazz, as Louis Armstrong is the genius of traditional jazz. One of these musicians, Charlie Christian, is not only a founder of modern jazz but also one of those who created from Swing the basis for the making of modern jazz. There is a whole group of such "pioneers": together the last generation of Swing and pathbreakers for bop. Among the trumpets, it is Roy Eldridge: among the pianists, Clyde Hart; among the tenors, Lester Young; among the bassists, Jimmy Blanton; among the drummers, Jo Jones and Dave Tough; among the guitarists, Charlie Christian. Bebop was an instrumental music. No singer could have made it. Charlie Parker forever changed the fundamental relationship between voices and instruments as it had existed up to that point. Horn players still had to breathe, and so they had to base their phrased on the length of the human breath, but no longer did they need to limit what they played to the boundaries of the voice. They played faster, way beyond what any human voice could make out with clarity, and they played melodies that never were meant to be sung. Bop never came as naturally to the voice as it did to Parker's alto saxophone and Dizzy Gillespie's trumpet and then to the other instruments. The new music may

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