The Philosophy of the American Settlers' Westward Expansion Leads to Expulsion of the Native Americans

1197 WordsJan 26, 20185 Pages
The people of the United States who were settling westward in the early nineteenth century viewed the Native Americans as a threat to westward expansion, and therefore pressured their leaders to set up policies that would remove Indians. Due to the long history various conflicts between Indians and Americans, the American settlers were apprehensive toward the Indians, leading to the perceived need of the removal of the Indians for their safety. Andrew Jackson’s negative attitude toward of the Indians also aroused public sentiment against them. Jackson’s position as a leader gave him more influence on the people, who knew of the battles he had won against the Indians during his time as an “Indian fighter.” The early 1800s was a period of westward expansion. The Great Migration was a time when moved thousands of Americans moved west, curious about unexplored western lands and wanting to acquire it. The appeal of the West grew, and settlers migrated. The ideals of the Manifest Destiny also had surfaced, that it was pre-ordained that the U.S. expand its borders to the Pacific Ocean. The American people did not like any Indian presence to impede their acquisition of lands westward and growth as a nation, despite trading with them frequently (Brinkley). The Manifest Destiny was, as stated in Cheryl D. Bohde’s article Young America, “…a philosophy that led to the expulsion of Native Americans from lands east of the of the Mississippi.” Conflicts with the Indians about

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