Essay on The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

919 Words4 Pages
Throughout a lifetime, many things are gained; experience, wisdom, knowledge, as well as a sure sense of self. But along with all these great things come regret, guilt, and shame of past events. Everyone deals with these in different ways, sometimes turning to religion and denial as coping mechanisms. In the novel The Poisonwood Bible, By Barbara Kingsolver, each member of the Price family deals with a personal guilt either gained while on their mission in the Congo or long before. This novel exemplifies the different types of guilt the Price family experienced throughout their stay in the Congo, and shows various means of reconciliation and forgiveness as the guilt is absolved. One method of dealing with guilt is to saturate one’s self…show more content…
Throughout a lifetime, many things are gained; experience, wisdom, knowledge, as well as a sure sense of self. But along with all these great things come regret, guilt, and shame of past events. Everyone deals with these in different ways, sometimes turning to religion and denial as coping mechanisms. In the novel The Poisonwood Bible, By Barbara Kingsolver, each member of the Price family deals with a personal guilt either gained while on their mission in the Congo or long before. This novel exemplifies the different types of guilt the Price family experienced throughout their stay in the Congo, and shows various means of reconciliation and forgiveness as the guilt is absolved. One method of dealing with guilt is to saturate one’s self in it. Leah Price, the stronger of the twins, gained an increasing amount of guilt while secluded from American society in the Congo. After being submersed in their culture for a few months and learning of their selfless ways, she soon looks upon her own past and sees regrets she had previously overlooked. For the first time she states that she actually feels bad about taking strength away from Adah while in the womb, leading to her presently crippled state. After Ruth May dies and they leave Kilanga, Leah’s guilt seems to pile up. Even though none of the girls were to blame for Ruth May’s death, she is haunted by a lingering feeling that she could have done something to prevent it. It is revealed from a journal entry when she is
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