The Power Of Power In Animal Farm, By James Orwell

967 Words4 Pages
Throughout history, leaders have proven that power has the ability to corrupt their actions. This is shown through many different leaders: Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, and Saddam Hussein. Occasionally, an unsuitable leader comes to power and uses their control to engage in the wrong behavior for their own benefit. An indistinguishable situation is present in the novel Animal Farm, By James Orwell. This novel tells the story of the animals who live on Manor Farm and rebel against their corrupt leader, Mr. Jones. After a successful rebellion, the pigs take on their role as leaders, but soon take advantage of their power and use it in villainous ways. The only logical reason for this occurrence is the effect that power has on leaders, like the…show more content…
To illustrate, Squealer lies to the animals by telling them that the pigs must eat all of the apples and drink the milk. After the animals question the strange disappearance of the apples and milk, Squealer covers up the crime by lying. “Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health” (31). Now that Squealer and the other pigs have control over the animals, they feel that they can take advantage of the animals. Squealer deceives the animals in a way that only a corrupt leader would. He protects his and the other pigs’ reputations by shielding the truth from the animals. In addition, Squealer stops following the amendments. Soon after the pigs establish their authority on the farm, the narrator announces a shocking occurrence. “It was a pig walking on his hind legs. Yes, it was Squealer” (116). For the first time, many of the animals realize that the pigs are slowly morphing into humans, the perpetrators. Not only is Squealer a hypocritical leader, but he also deviates from the original rules on the farm. His abandonment of the law makes him an unfit and cruel…show more content…
For example, he prosecuted many innocent animals. During a meeting with the animals, Napoleon violates one of the most important rules on the farm. “Immediately the dogs bounded forward, seized four of the pigs by the ear and dragged them, squealing with pain and terror, to Napoleon’s feet” (74). The worst sort of a leader is one who will murder one of their own citizens in order to establish fear, which is precisely what Napoleon did. Corruption can cause leaders to commit many dreadful acts, but death is amongst the worst of them all. This is not just an example of corruption, but it is indefinitely a sign of dictatorship. Next, Napoleon sends Boxer to the knackers. Shortly after Boxer sustains an injury, Benjamin, the old donkey that normally refuses to read, discovers where the pigs are sending Boxer. “Alfred Simmonds, Horse Slaughterer and glue boiler, Willingdon. Dealers in hides and bone meal! Kennels supplied. Do you not understand what this means? They are taking Boxer to the knackers!” (108). Napoleon is the worst example of a leader, because he lies and betrays his own citizens. Boxer was the most loyal, hardworking animal on the farm, but Napoleon’s corruption from power causes him to simply send Boxer to the knacker, without hesitation. Power leads Napoleon to do whatever he , as he was the rule maker and no one was going to stop him from sending Boxer
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