The Presentation of the Story Dracula by the Filmmakers Essay

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The Presentation of the Story Dracula by the Filmmakers

There have been many film adaptations of the novel 'Dracula' written by Bram Stoker (1897) the most well known of these is the film 'Nosferatu' (1921) directed by Fredrick Murnau and 'Bram Stoker's Dracula' (1992) created by Francis Ford Coppola.

I will be discussing the ways the filmmakers have presented the story 'Dracula' by; the ways in which the directors have introduced the film: their portrayal of Dracula: the use of special effects and finally the myths and legends used in the destruction of Dracula.

'Bram Stoker's Dracula' by Francis Ford Coppola, and 'Nosferatu' directed by Murnau have both represented the story Dracula in
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Music was an important aspect in both films.

However both directors have chosen to interpret and introduce the story of 'Dracula' in different ways. In 'Bram Stoker's Dracula' Coppola begins the story in Transylvania during 1462, but in 'Nosferatu' the story begins later in Bremen, Germany during 1838. Coppola begins the story so early because it links with the historical points that Bram Stoker based his novel on. It also gives the audience a clear insight into the story ahead. The way Coppola has added the historical points shows that he has wanted to make the film more exciting, and adds tension but it more importantly shows Coppola wanted to expend on the original story and wanted to make the audience feel they were involved in the film. In 'Bram Stoker's Dracula' you see the characters Count Dracula and his wife Elizabetha, then you begin to learn about their personalities. Dracula is a Christian warlord and Elizabetha commits suicide when see is falsely told of her husband's death. Coppola has put Dracula at the beginning of the film so that the audience understand why Dracula is a vampire.

Murnau's 'Nosferatu' is in black and white and synchronized speak is not available. In 'Nosferatu' a special camera technique called 'Fade in' and 'Fade out' is used. When a scene finishes it fades in and out and then a new scene fades back in. At