The Progressive movement of the 1900’s

700 WordsApr 23, 20193 Pages
The Progressive movement of the 1900’s was the most important event to occur in the United States during the twentieth century. Progressives at first concentrated on improving the lives of those living in slums and in getting rid of corruption in government. The goal was to make working conditions better for the workers. True reform needed to happen. The workers of America believed this to be the best nation with opportunities for all people. Reform started with industrialization. Workers needed healthy and safe places to work, especially for women and children who were considered vulnerable and weak during that time period. Women and children over 14 worked at meat trimming sausage making and canning. “The Jungle” by Upton Sinclair in one…show more content…
The big things exposed were the horrors of poverty, slums, dangerous working conditions, and child labor to name but a few. Therefore, in 1906 Roosevelt enacted the Meat Inspection Act which is now known as the Food and Drug Administration. The Progressive era also included workers’ safety and health but meatpacking plant. He felt that he had the public’s best interest at heart. Roosevelt also did not approve of Congressmen for being more interested in themselves instead of the people they were serving. This is when the term “muck-racker” came into play. With modern terminology today the muck-rackers are known as whistle blowers. The muck-rackers exposed the dark side of society. The big things exposed were the horrors of poverty, slums, dangerous working conditions, and child labor to name but a few. Therefore, in 1906 Roosevelt enacted the Meat Inspection Act which is now known as the Food and Drug Administration. The Progressive era also included workers’ safety and health but only after a deadly fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company on March 25, 1911. The company did not trust its workers. The doors and elevators were all locked except for the eighth floor. The workers were all located on the eighth, ninth, and tenth floors. The factory was largely a female work force. “Workers on the eighth and tenth floors were able to escape unharmed, but those on the ninth floor were not so lucky” (Mangus, lecture). During World War I, women found
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