The Pros And Cons Of Disobedience

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The Mpemba Effect is the observation that warm water freezes quicker than cold water in certain circumstances. The warm water seems counterintuitive but ultimately catalyzes the freezing process. The warm water represents disobedience and the freezing process represents social progress. Disobedience has a negative connotation, which contradicts the idea of positive progression but in many cases, can actually accelerate it. Many commonly misinterpret disobedience as violence, when in actuality, some of the most powerful reformers in history have emphasized nonviolence. Rosa Parks, the Greensboro Sit-ins, and the Birmingham Campaign all validate the idea that disobedience generates social progress. The rebellious Rosa Parks kick-started the…show more content…
On February 1, 1960 four African American freshmen attending North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University walked into a Woolworths department store. After purchasing toothpaste and other items from a desegregated register, the men, later referred to as the Greensboro Four, continued on to the lunch counter. In accordance to the stores policy, a counter designated as “whites only” could deny service to any and all African Americans. Therefore, the employee denied the men the coffee that had asked for. The four students simultaneously protested Woolworth’s refusal of service by occupying the seats until the store closed that day. This effort continued in subsequent days, weeks, and months while growing in size, publicity, and notoriety. Over the course of the protest, Woolworth lost over $200,000 in sales, which is equivalent to $1.6 million in today’s economy. The act of defiance led by those four men eventually led to Woolworth’s repealing their segregation policy. On a bigger scale, the Greensboro sit-in sparked a national trend of organized protests. This protest reminded me of my sixth grade year when my school’s entire student body opposed the newly enforced seating arrangement in the lunch room. The basis behind my school’s protest was similar to that of the Greensboro
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