The Pros And Cons Of Harry Potter

1487 Words6 Pages
Since Harry Potter’s release there has been much conversation surrounding the controversies around it. From being considered occultic and anti-Christian to being thought of as poison to children’s minds, Harry Potter earned a spot on the list of books banned from being taught in public schools. There were many arguments concerning Harry Potter. While being written and published as a young adult book meant for ages 10 and up, many adults did not find it suitable for this age group. Jacqui Komschlies, being one who is against the teaching of Harry Potter as a piece of literature in schools, stated that the books were similar to “orange soda” mixed with “rat poison”. He, along with many others, argues that Harry Potter and all of its…show more content…
For this reason, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone made its way onto the list of banned books.
Christian parents fear that the book paints magic in a manner that is good, while their religion enforces the idea that magic is the fruit of dark labor. Seemingly, there are several ways that the story of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone can be said to be rat poison disguised as orange soda. It stands to reason that the story is a brilliantly written piece of fiction, that draws readers in with meticulous and vivid descriptions, leaving no stone unturned in the mind. The way this book is written allows for readers to delve into the world of Harry Potter while understanding that it is a figment of Rowling’s imagination. Although readers may be aware that this is fictional, they voluntarily ignore this fact, put their disbeliefs to the side and when reading become completely encompassed in the story. Fantasizing about receiving an owl for Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is not how parents intend their children to spend their eleventh birthday. The thought of their home being filled with letters inviting their children to study magic as seen in chapter three is terrifying to people who classify magic as a part of the dark world. On page 41 Rowling writes:
“No post on Sundays,” he reminded the cheerfully as he spread marmalade on his newspapers, “no damn letters today-”. Something came whizzing down the
Get Access