The Pros And Cons Of Postmodernism

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Postmodernism is a loose-umbrella term that is used to describe a myriad of ideologies which originated after the modern era. It is that complex whole of perspectives which reject the core principles of modern( and enlightenment) thought. It stretches its ideological framework into various fields of knowledge which include—but are not limited to—Science, Economics, Politics, and Philosophy. The central claim of Postmodernism is that there is no one over-raiding metanarrative. In other words, there is no such thing as an absolute truth, nor is there such a thing as objectivity. Thus, reality becomes a matrix of perception which changes based on the interpretation upon which it was forged. Hence, Jean-Francois Lyotard— a French philosopher—defined…show more content…
Postmodernists argue that because modern science was developed by a group of people which were ensconced in a European culture, they carried their subjective biases and prejudices into the scientific inquiry. By this logic, science does not seem like an objective method through which to investigate the world, but rather an enterprise that serve to adhere to a particular socio-political agenda. To elaborate, they believe that science, in its contemporary state, does not produce objective facts, but rather it offers a limited manner through which to cultivate the world. Specifically, a white-masculine-elite view of the world. This means that new types of epistemologies—such as the feminist epistemology—should be introduced to paint the full picture of reality. Thus, science seems to offer a one-dimensional narrative that needs the perspectives of so-called marginalized, oppressed groups to be complete. This line of reasoning is intrinsically flawed for a multitude of reasons. First
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