The Punishment Of The Death Penalty

867 Words4 Pages
Despite the widespread abandonment of death sentencing by many developed nations, the United States continues to execute citizens every year. The standard methods used to execute Americans have evolved over time. Each state has adopted their own preferences for sentencing those convicted of the most heinous crimes. Death by lethal injection is now most commonly practiced and hangings, firing squads, and the electric chair, have been progressively phased out. American society continues to dignify which methods are cruel and unusual, but will not principally condemn the practice. Those who oppose capital punishment argue that it serves no purpose. If there is no rational utility in killing convicts, maybe more people would feel compelled to abandon it all together. In reality, the only utilities ever reaffirmed by supporters of the death penalty are those involving retribution or deterring elements. Should a decision concerning the fate of a person’s life be made in court? Is it possible for the government to simultaneously curb violence and to justify executing people? Taking a life for vengeance will not right the wrong, and violence only breeds more violence. Many people who support capital punishment are under the impression that it costs more to imprison a person than it does to kill them with lethal injection. What most people don’t take into consideration is how quickly expenses add up in the U.S. justice system. When a person is charged with capital murder, it is
Get Access