Essay on The Ratification Debate

696 WordsFeb 27, 20153 Pages
The Ratification Debate Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists People had many different opinions on the ratification of the Constitution. There were Federalists and Anti-Federalists that debated on many topics of the Constitution. The main reasons were: what type of government the United States of America should have, the people controlling our government, and some of the powers they should have. The Federalists were the ones who wanted change. They wanted to make changes to the government that was originally proposed. The Federalists wanted the government to protect the people, but not abuse their powers. They wanted to have the powers divided between the national and the state governments. The Constitution also stated that the government…show more content…
The other sections of the government made sure that they didn’t have too much control over the whole central government. They gave each branch of government their own powers, and the branches wanted to protect these powers by not abusing them. (Fed 52). The Anti-Federalists argued that their form of government was more effective. They argued many points that were reasonable. Brutus wrote that he feared that our government would be controlled by a group of elites, and he thought that these elites would abuse the people’s rights by just doing what would only benefit them. Brutus thought once the elites started running our country, that they would be in power for a long time and no one could change their minds on certain views. (Brutus 1). He also brought up the fact that the large republic could not incorporate all the views of the small republics. The government would be too far away to even care about the concerns of a small town thousands of miles away. Brutus also thought that the government would only consist of the wealthy “elite” people and wouldn’t represent the needs of the common people. (Brutus 1). These different views on government made many people think hard on what type of government they wanted. In the end, the Federalist’s point of view won. Today, this type of government still exists. It made one of the
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