The Real Mccoy. Black History Month Is A Time To Recognize

1425 WordsFeb 27, 20176 Pages
The Real McCoy Black history month is a time to recognize and acknowledge the accomplishments and achievements of black Africans around the world. It is also a time to recognize the role that they, African Americans played in history. The month of February was chosen to be dedicated to black history month because of Abraham Lincoln and Fredrick Douglas’ birthdays. I feel that black history month is a very important time of the year because we get the chance to learn how poorly and unfairly Africans were treated by Caucasians. Africans did not have the same rights to education, voting, health care etc. They were also mistreated by many Caucasians because of their skin colour. The racism was extremely bad and there was nothing you could do…show more content…
Elijah McCoy grew up in a huge household, he had a total of 11 siblings! Since his father had ties with Britain it was useful as Elijah McCoy pursued his education. He was raised on a farm and went to school for black children. Can you believe that even in Canada during the 19th century it was still this segregated? When McCoy was young he had an interest in mechanics. During his spare time, he often took apart household items and put them back together. He also fixed many household appliances and was successful most of the time. In 1847 the McCoy’s returned to the United States (U.S.).McCoy won the credentials of a master in mechanics and engineering at Edinburgh. At the age of 15, Elijah McCoy traveled to Scotland for an apprenticeship in mechanical engineering, with the support of his parents. The reason McCoy had to travel halfway around the world to Scotland was because in Canada and the U.S. they did not offer training at that comparable quality for Africans. While McCoy was in Scotland, civil war in the U.S. broke out and the American slaves were free. When McCoy first returned to Michigan he was unable to find work due to racial barriers. The racial barriers included that no Africans were allowed to hold a professional position no matter how qualified or skilled they were. Later on in 1870, McCoy accepted a position as a fireman and oiler for the Michigan Central Railroad. As a fireman, he
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