The Recent Repatriation Laws Set Up By Egypt And The Subsequent Demands From The United States

2160 Words Nov 23rd, 2014 9 Pages
The recent repatriation laws set up by Egypt and the subsequent demands from other nations have stirred up great debates over who is to have possession over the priceless ancient artifacts. In the last few decades many countries including Egypt have proclaimed that they want the return of many of their uncovered artifacts. Egypt 's ' demands stretch from museums in the United States to Europe, with growing controversy from both sides as to who rightfully owns these historical artifacts. Simply put, all artifacts discovered in Egypt do technically belong to Egypt. Egyptian museums should have the right to showcase the history of their ancient predecessors by showcasing the material culture of their past uncovered from that time. However, the United States along with other Western nations, particularly England counter their claim by saying that it is in the majorities interest that artifacts from around the world can be seen in "universal museums". That in contrast to the museums in Egypt, a museum such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art presents to a more diverse audience who can view and appreciate the value of "the greatest of family trees, in which every culture finds its branch". The argument for universal museums is coupled with the instability of Egypt that results in constant looting of Egyptian museums. Leaving us with the question of "what is the best way to protect our worlds cultural heritage?" Is it best if museums already in possession of ancient artifacts…

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