The Representation Of The Quetzalcoatl ( Feathered Serpent ) Of Quetzalcoatl, Guerrero, And Ouebla, Mexico

947 WordsSep 19, 20154 Pages
The artist was either male or female, we don’t know exactly, but we do know they were from the Mixtec culture that included the regions of Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Ouebla, Mexico. Furthermore knowing the artists’ culture we have a better understanding of the significance of the representation of the Quetzalcóatl (feathered serpent) on this three-dimensional plate. The plate itself seems to be 10 inches wide and symmetrical. The feathered god covers the whole diameter of the plate. Though it’s called a plate, we can speculate that this wasn’t a traditional plate for food, but rather than a plate to show sacredness of the mighty god. The artist’s palate of colors that they chose is red, brown and white. In the artist’s palate, the color red is very relevant to the subject of Quetzalcóatl. This color covers the whole plate showing how significant red is to this piece of artwork. Correspondingly this red isn’t a normal bright red, but more of a mahogany red to represent the symbolism of blood within the story of Quetzalcóatl. The Indianapolis Musuem of Art explains, “Quetzalcóatl was an important Mesoamerican hero-god who created humanity from his own blood.”1 The red symbolizes blood because of the connection of the color red, blood is red and also this piece is mostly red, so we can speculate that the artist chose the color red to connect the story of Quetzalcóatl making humanity from his own blood. Similarly the brown on the serpent, even has a reddish tint to it. It is evident

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