The Revelation Flannery O Connor Analysis

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Spencer Winkle Professor Davis Eng. 002 26 June 2016 “Revelation”: An Analysis Flannery O’ Connor was a woman whose literary merit compares to no other. O’ Connor passing away before her 40th birthday is nothing short of a tragedy. She was a woman of conviction in a profane world. “I believe too that there is only one Reality and that that is the end of it, but the term, “Christian Realism,” has become necessary for me, perhaps in a purely academic way, because I find myself in a world where everybody has his compartment, puts you in yours, shuts the door and departs. One of the awful things about writing when you are a Christian is that for you the ultimate reality is the Incarnation, the present reality is the Incarnation, and nobody…show more content…
Turpin, who knew it, supplied the last line mentally, "And wona these days I know I'll we-eara crown” (O’Connor 5). Being able to recite gospel lyrics without hesitation proves Mrs. Turpin is a devout woman of faith. Although she may be spiritual she suffers the fault of judging and comparing herself to others this fault is a direct product of her environment. This quote epitomizes her fault “Sometimes Mrs. Turpin occupied herself at night naming the classes of people. On the bottom of the heap were most colored people, not the kind she would have been if she had been one, but most of them; then next to them -- not above, just away from -- were the white-trash; then above them were the home-owners, and above them the home-and-land owners, to which she and Claud belonged, above she and Claud were people with a lot of money and much bigger houses and much more land” (O’ Connor 6). Even with her faults Mrs. Turpin showed compassion to the help that her and Claud would bring to work their crops. “When they come in the morning, I run out and I say," “How yal this morning?' and when Claud drives them off to the field I just wave to beat the band and they just wave back." And she waved her hand rapidly to illustrate. And when they come in from the field, I run out with a bucket of ice water” (O’Conner10). It is apparent that Mrs. Turpin’s compassion does not go…show more content…
“This one was hardly bigger than a garage. The table was cluttered with limp- looking magazines and at one end of it there was a big green glass ashtray full of cigarette butts and cotton wads with little blood spots on them. If she had had anything to do with the running of the place, that would have been emptied every so often. There were no chairs against the wall at the head of the room. It had a rectangular-shaped panel in it that permitted a view of the office where the nurse came and went and the secretary listened to the radio. A plastic fern, in a gold pot sat in the opening and trailed its fronds down almost to the floor. The radio was softly playing gospel music” (O’Connor 3). As the Turpins waited Mrs. Turpin began to describe the other waiting room occupants to pass the time. Mrs. Turpin can be seen as a larger woman who is proud of her means and then there is her husband Claud who can be described as a “florid, bald, sturdy and shorter than Mrs. Turpin (O’Connor 1). Next was an unnamed blonde child whose attire consisted of a dirty blue romper, the boy’s mother was seen “wearing on a yellow sweatshirt and wine- colored slacks, both gritty-looking, and the rims of her lips were stained with snuff. Her dirty yellow hair was tied behind with a little piece of red paper ribbon” (O’Connor 5). The next woman is called the “stylish woman” by
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