The Rights Of American Citizens

2057 Words9 Pages
In June 2013, Edward Snowden—a former agent for the Central Intelligence Agency—leaked confidential government information to the public through The Guardian by journalists that consequently published it on the Internet. In doing so, Snowden exposed the National Security Agency’s (NSA) spy programs that infringe upon the rights of American citizens, which has catalyzed legal controversy and skepticism towards the United States government due to the violation of privacy (Liu 2014). The Internet is a vast host for a plethora of information and communication between people; private activities and messages between people are not protected under United States laws, which can be exploited. The problem is seen in the NSA’s unwarranted…show more content…
With the ever-changing dynamics of the Internet and its vast freedom, the United States government needs to update its laws and create new laws to adapt to technology today. Currently, there are laws today such as the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) that were passed in order to incorporate government surveillance into the electronic age; however, “it has not [been] meaningfully updated since the advent of the World Wide Web” (1264). The Internet has been in existence since 1969—and since the ECPA has not been updated since then, it is outdated. With such an outdated and ineffective law, there needs to be changes made to public policy in correlation with perpetually changing technology to protect the privacy rights of American citizens across social networks. The CrimPC system is an ideal system to construct new privacy protection and surveillance laws that do not violate the American Constitution, as “CrimPC regulates more surveillance techniques than ECPA [by] restricting the use of undercover agents in law enforcement; neither the ECPA nor any United States statute or constitutional provision regulates undercover operatives” (1268).
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