The Rights Of Illegal Gambling Information From A Payphone Booth From The City Of Los Angeles

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Introduction: In 1967, the petitioner Charles Katz was charged in violating 18 U.S.C. § 1084 for transmitting illegal gambling information from a payphone booth from the city of Los Angeles to individuals in Boston and Miami (Katz v. United States, 389 U.S. 347 (1967)). The FBI had been aware of Katz illegal activities after following him extensively, and in an effort to bring evidence against him, placed an electronic eavesdropping device on the phone booth he had made calls from during previous events. Once the FBI obtained enough evidence to convict him on grounds of illegal sharing of gambling information, the petitioner Katz was arrested. The FBI agents pursuing the case against Katz had adhered to requirements set for applying wiretaps, but had not sought a warrant to allow the use, nor did these individuals report their results to a judge (Katz v. United States Significance). The case brought to question the right to privacy in public space, and if that right extended to pay phone booths, and also if a search warrant necessary is necessary without physical intrusion to gain information. Facts: Katz was originally tried in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California (Katz v. United States Significance) where he was found guilty of the charges brought against him. However, Katz contested this ruling on the grounds that wiretapping a phone booth in a public space constituted unlawful violation of an individual’s privacy. The matter was appealed and

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