The Rights Of The United States

1219 WordsMar 6, 20165 Pages
It is well known that the United States have been seen internationally as a key actor, for better or worse, when it comes to the field of universal human rights. At the same time, recent events have shown a disassociation between the words and actions of the nation. Despite the fact that these rights are supposed to be constitutionally-protected, the United States has been criticized for repeatedly violating them not only in the past but in recent memory: criminalization of poverty and homelessness, violation of the privacy of citizens all over the world, racism, police brutality, the prison-for-profit system, mistreatment or even torture of the prisoners. These are just some examples of the most common forms of human rights violations…show more content…
Not only does it make a society conducive in the world realm, as opposed to a closed state like North Korea, but it stands as a shield from the abuse of power. Freedom of expression has almost always been and continues to be a defining characteristic of United States society and politics. The country was quite literally built on the idea of having basic freedoms in life. In fact, it was these same principles in which the United States operates around the world, beneath the guise of bringing the same values in other, less fortunate countries. Which only leads to emphasize the manner in which some so called freedoms are often challenged within the social and political spheres of the United States. Freedom of expression is not only an essential part of human rights but it is also important within the social and political institutions of the United States specifically. Therefore, not only are whistleblowers within their right when publishing material to a public forum, they are contributing to the public discourse on security, transparency, and civil liberties. In this country the Freedom of expression, which encompasses speech, media, and public assembly, is considered as an important right, and as such is given special protection: having its recognition by the First Amendment of the constitution. The Amendment was adopted on December 15, 1791, and it states: “Congress shall make no law
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