The Rise Of Poe By Edgar Allan Poe

1635 WordsMay 4, 20177 Pages
The Rise of Poe The words people use and how they use them holds so much power within themselves. It seems that, people are always searching for the right words to express their true emotions towards a certain subject. Artists and authors manage to make a living off of knowing how to use the right words to reach through to their platform. Though within his time, Edgar Allan Poe did not have an established platform and was seen as estranged; he still dabbled as an author and has made many famous short stories and poems that we enjoy to this day. Poe uses tone, diction, imagery, symbolism, elements of the supernatural, and allusions to illustrate his themes of sorrow, madness, revenge, and uses these to project and give refuge to his inner…show more content…
Whenever the clocked chimed, the guests were filled with fear that they could be next, and everything that is happening at that moment is temporary… such as their short-lived happiness and life span. No matter how much they try to ignore and escape what’s happening outside the walls of Prince Prospero’s home, it still ends up getting them in the end. Much like Tuberculosis, where there was no cure and death was inevitable. He showcases all the different stages of living to dying while, Prince Prospero and the Red Death, go through the stages of acceptance backwards leading to the manifestation of Poe’s inner demons. Certainly to even establish the tone one has to choose their diction. Edgar Allan Poe, as said before, had a way of describing certain items and events. He did so in a way, that the reader is physically there or even being told in depth from a person that’s being conversed with. Many times, the speaker within the story starts off with, “Yet, mad am I not…” (271) or even, “but why will you say that I am mad?” (228) The speaker poses these rhetorical questions that make you question their psychosis. The 3rd person point of view surely gives rise, to giving the readers the task of analyzing and choosing whether to side with the speaker or not. Edgar Allan Poe, was not so sane himself, either. Poe was known for being a drunk, a gambler, and certainly struggled with so much to the depths that it reflected enough in his stories to
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